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bombus affinis

In many cases, the general habitat descriptions should provide greater clarity and direction to the surveyor. The family Apidae includes the well-known and Data may not reflect true distribution since much of the state has not been thoroughly surveyed. The red-belted (Bombus rufocinctus) has many different color patterns. Vol. Typically, the first segment (fused to the thorax) is yellow, and the second segment half yellow and half brown, but in some individuals both segments are brown. Bumble bees can be distinguished from other bees by the thick hair covering their head, thorax, and abdomen and the structure on their hind legs called the “pollen basket”. With foraging habitat that includes dunes, marshes, forests, farmland and urban areas, the rusty-patched bumble bee is considered a habitat generalist. Bombus affinis (Cresson) was first described by Cresson (1863). economically important honey bees and bumble bees, as well as carpenter bees, cuckoo Rusty-patched males and workers are medium-sized bumblebees, averaging .5 inches in length, with stocky, round head, face, and area between the wings being black in color, while the remainder of the thorax is yellow. approximately 250 described species of bumble bees in the world, and over 50 species in 1994. State Status: SC - Special Concern (rare or uncertain; not legally protected) The rusty-patched bumble bee is unique among the bumble bees of North America in that the queens have a different color pattern than the workers. MSU is an affirmative-action, equal-opportunity employer. North America (Williams 1998). US Status: LE - Listed Endangered Wong, S.A. Cameron and C. Favret. 34pp. Bombus affinis are typically active in MN from mid-May through late October, but have been seen from early April to early November. Size: While size is highly variable within most bumble bee species, the rusty-patched bumble bee is generally larger, and stouter than the half-black bumble bee. of description (Hymenoptera: Apidae, Bombini). Canadian These data are from the Minnesota Bee Atlas project. Compare this to the long face of the half-black bumble bee, which has a similar color pattern on the abdomen. Rarely, there will be reddish pile on other abdominal segments (3-6). Nests are usually underground, in old rodent burrows. Conservation strategies for bumblebees center around preserving healthy natural habitat areas, reducing pesticide/herbicide use, and promoting native wildflower reestablishment within urban and agricultural landscapes. Notes on the nesting habits of some of the less common New England With foraging habitat that includes dunes, marshes, forests, farmland and urban areas, the rusty-patched bumble bee is considered a habitat generalist. Populations have declined severely since the late 1990s. They are not the only bumble bee with this coloring on the thorax, but if you think you see the rusty-patch on a bee, make sure you can also see the thumb-tack. The second abdominal segment has a rusty reddish patch centrally, with yellow hairs around the edges of the segment. Oxford University Press, New York. 1962. It is now listed as an endangered species in the US and Canada, currently found in low numbers in a very small part of its former range. It varies greatly in color, from brown to orange. Williams, P. H. 1998. Bombus affinis is known by the common name rusty patched bumble bee, due to a characteristic brownish orange patch on the second abdominal segment of workers and males. They also do not have the black thumb-tack on their thorax. In future versions of the Rare Species Explorer, we hope to incorporate natural community fidelity ranks for each taxon. They also do not have the thumb tack of black hairs on their thorax. The brown-belted (Bombus griseocollis) has a rusty brown patch on the second abdominal segment, but it is bordered at the back by black hairs. and L. Packer. Bombus affinis queens and workers differ slightly in coloration (an uncommon feature in bumble bees), the primary differences being the absence of the black band and narrow V on the thorax, and the absence of the rusty patch in the in the queen. Information is summarized from MNFI's database of rare species and community occurrences. In most cases, at least one specimen record exists for each listed natural community. Abdominal coloration varies. COSEWIC. 2008. viii. Abdominal segments 1 and 2 are entirely yellow. Workers are 11 to 16 mm in length, 5 to 9 mm in breadth (Mitchell 1962). Additionally, planting hedgerows and restoring native grasses along field margins, and in urban parks and residential yards provides habitat for small mammals, whose abandoned holes will in turn become bumblebee nesting and hibernating habitat (Goulson 2010). 1983. It is now listed as an endangered species in the US and Canada, currently found in … Some have orange hairs on the 2nd abdominal segment, but they also do not have the thumb tack of black hairs on their thorax. Ecology of species of Bombus Latr. bees, digger bees, stingless bees, and orchid bees. Natural communities are not listed for those species documented only from altered or ruderal habitats in Michigan, especially for taxa that occur in a variety of habitats outside of the state. Workers are 11 to 16 mm in length, 5 to 9 mm in breadth (Mitchell 1962). There are two key features to look for to distinguish the rusty-patched bumble bee males and workers from other bumble bees. Their hair is entirely black on the head, the bottom of the thorax, and in large part on the legs. 2010. Bulletin of the Natural History Commercial Fruit and Vegetable Production, Regional Sustainable Development Partnerships, Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Education. The species most commonly confused with rusty-patched are the tri-colored, the brown-belted, the half-black, and the red-belted. Nests are usually underground, in old rodent burrows. The half-black (Bombus vagans) can appear to have a patch on the second abdominal segment, but this is trick of lighting and is usually just a spot that appears darker due to the dark cuticle showing through a thinner patch of hair. Management potential of sixteen North American bumble bee species. Their key features are a bit more difficult to distinguish from the similarly colored half-black bumble bee. The thumb-tack: The hairs on the thorax of the rusty-patched bumble bees are yellow with a T-shaped area of black hairs with the top part of the T stretching between the wings with a thin line extending down the middle towards the back of the thorax.

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